Archive for film photography

Fabulous Film Fridays – The Last Post (Dec. 30, 2011)

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays, TCBlog with tags , , , , , , on December 30, 2011 by Darwin

Samantha and my Fabulous Film Fridays project that we shared between our blogs and which started on December 31, 2010 has come to its year-end. It has been a blast shooting once a week with our film cameras. If you liked this project be sure to head over to our new website and blog and get the free Fabulous Film Friday eBook which will launch next Friday (January 6, 2012). As most of you know this blog will end on December 31st with its final entry; please join me over at oopoomoo where my new adventure begins!

Speaking of end projects, Samantha is giving her course: Learning to “Speak’ the Language of Visual Expression one last time. This course has gotten rave reviews and so if you are keen to ramp up your visual knowledge, be sure to sign up for the January 2nd, 2012 start date!

Both photos taken with Tachihara Tim using Fuji Instant Print Film

Fabulous Film Fridays – December 23, 2011

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 23, 2011 by Darwin

Below are two photos made after a fresh snowfall in Cochrane while Samantha and I were walking our dog, Brando. These were shot with “Einstein” our glass lens Holga (which is our ‘sharp’ Holga). To see just how sharp, click on the photos for larger views. Thanks for looking!

©Darwin Wiggett - The Bow River at sunset in Cochrane, Alberta

©Darwin Wiggett - Park bench in Cochrane at sunset

Fabulous Film Fridays – December 9, 2011

Posted in Art of Photography, Fabulous Film Fridays, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , on December 9, 2011 by Darwin

Here are three Holga shots from Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park near Cochrane, Alberta. IF you want to learn more about the park and all of its winter possibilities for photographers be sure to sign up for our Twoonie Talk (2 dollars to get in) on Jan 21, 2012 in Cochrane – for more information please see here.

©Darwin Wiggett - Kodak Portra 160

©Darwin Wiggett - Kodak Portra 160

©Darwin Wiggett - Kodak Portra 160

Fabulous Film Fridays – November 25, 2011

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2011 by Darwin

Alberta recently passed a distracted driving law where you not supposed to text, put on make-up, or sketch while driving. I looked carefully at the regulations and there was nothing there about using a Holga while driving (but electronic cameras are banned – yeah for film!). So last time I went into Banff National Park I pulled out the Holga at nearly 100 KMPH (check the speedometre in the photo) and snapped this shot of Cascade Mountain from the Trans Canada Highway (as you can see the road was empty so who was I distracting anyway?). Safety first though; I was wearing my hard hat and steel-toed boots while doing this dangerous exercise (and I did put my coffee down before snapping the shot)! ;-)

©Darwin Wiggett - Holga GN120, Fuji NPH400 film

Fabulous Film Fridays – Back to Back Again

Posted in Art of Photography, Fabulous Film Fridays, Image Processing and Software, Instruction, TCBlog with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2011 by Darwin

Last week Sam posted a comparison of the same subject shot with film and digital. Her point was to show that the two media deliver very different results and that neither was ‘true’ to her experience of being there. Of course, we all know that cameras do not record things exactly like we see them. Some capture devices seem ‘truer’ than others but none record the ‘truth’ (5 human observers to the same event will all ‘record’ or remember the event differently – so what is truth anyway?).

Given that there is no universal truth then it simply becomes a question of what tool (camera, film type, digital sensor type, processing workflow etc)  returns results closer to the way you view or want to present the world in your art. Of course you can enhance or alter the capture in processing (either in the digital or chemical darkroom) to get the results even closer to your personal view. I believe it’s always better to use the media that delivers results closest to where you want to end up, rather than shaving a square block down to fit into a round hole (but maybe that is just me, some of you might like the shaving process ;-)).

The two images below were photographed at the Nordegg mine and were taken at the same time as Sam’s shots in her post. The results of the comparison look similar to the Sam’s in terms of colour and contrast. Which you prefer is personal, you might like one better than the other, or you might not like either rendition. Your job as a photographer is to translate what you see and feel about a scene to your viewer. Using the media that gets you the results you want is really all that matters.

©Darwin Wiggett

Above – Shot with a Tachihara 4×5 view camera using Fujichrome Velvia 50 slide film (I used a flashlight to paint light onto the wheels – the orange cast).

Below – Shot with a Canon EOS-1ds digital camera and light-painted as described above.

©Darwin Wiggett

The Weekly Photo – November 7, 2011

Posted in Art of Photography, Image Processing and Software, Techniques, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 7, 2011 by Darwin

Making photos usually does not stop at pressing the shutter. Image making is a three part process and this process was really popularized by Ansel Adams in his series of books; The Camera, The Negative and The Print. In today’s digital world photography world, we capture images in our camera, we process the resulting image (often a RAW ‘negative’) in the computer and then we output our images to print (or the web) so the process has not changed just the technology of how we do the process.

I would add a fourth component to Ansel Adams equation and that is The Person. The camera does not make the image; it is the photographer. What interests you, what attracts your eye, what you choose to include or exclude, how you compose and ‘see’ are individual and personal. So let’s not forget that the end product is the result of the personal vision of the photographer (and this vision can and should carry through from seeing to capture, development and print).

As a photographer who learned and grew up photographically using slide film, I was mostly denied the luxury of carrying my photographic vision beyond the press of the shutter. The end product was the slide (a piece of positive film). The image was ‘processed’ by a lab and there was little ‘creative’ input at the processing stage (save for altering the the exposure by pushing or pulling the development). Really, the film was developed in a set formula to insure that the exposure captured in-camera was the exposure that came out on the slide. And as far as printing was concerned slide film could be printed but with difficulty and serious photographic printers stuck with negative film. Mostly slides were used to hand to publishers who printed the image in books and magazines and calendars (the printing was out of the photographer’s control). The simple point here is that a slide shooter had to use all his or her craft and art in the capture stage. The image had to be finished in-camera. End of story.

I was reminded of the ‘getting it right’ in-camera during a recent Creative Expression Masterclass workshop with Royce Howland and Samantha Crysanthou. For some of the exercises in seeing we needed participants to capture images in-camera using JPEG and the images were not to be processed after the fact. Having to capture what to what you see and getting it the best possible in-camera is great exercise in discipline. Even this former slide shooter realized just how much I have come to rely on ‘enhancing’ my personal vision through the development of the digital negative. The image below is an in-camera JPEG capture and this image reminded me how rewarding it was and is to get a completely finished image in-camera. No post-processing was done on this image save for resizing and sharpening for the web.

©Darwin Wiggett

Canon EOS-1ds Mark III, Canon TS-E 24mm lens, 1/4s at f11, Singh-Ray LB warming polarizer, Singh-Ray 3 stop soft-edge grad filter.

Fabulous Film Fridays – October 28, 2011

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2011 by Darwin

In early September, Samantha, Hiroaki Kobayashi and I went on an afternoon film outing at the RancheHouse in Cochrane, Alberta. Both Sam and Hiro shot with their 4×5 view cameras while I used Linny, my Linhof 6×12 panorama camera. Sam posted her results last week and you can see Hiro’s results at this link. Below are my three favorite shots from the session. Click on each image to see a much larger version.

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome Velvia 50 film

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome 50 Velia film

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome 50 Velvia film

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