Archive for Samantha Chrysanthou

Fabulous Film Fridays – The Last Post (Dec. 30, 2011)

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays, TCBlog with tags , , , , , , on December 30, 2011 by Darwin

Samantha and my Fabulous Film Fridays project that we shared between our blogs and which started on December 31, 2010 has come to its year-end. It has been a blast shooting once a week with our film cameras. If you liked this project be sure to head over to our new website and blog and get the free Fabulous Film Friday eBook which will launch next Friday (January 6, 2012). As most of you know this blog will end on December 31st with its final entry; please join me over at oopoomoo where my new adventure begins!

Speaking of end projects, Samantha is giving her course: Learning to “Speak’ the Language of Visual Expression one last time. This course has gotten rave reviews and so if you are keen to ramp up your visual knowledge, be sure to sign up for the January 2nd, 2012 start date!

Both photos taken with Tachihara Tim using Fuji Instant Print Film

I oopoomoo, do you?

Posted in Art of Photography, Controversy, Inspirations, TCBlog, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , on December 7, 2011 by Darwin

Today is the official release date of oopoomoo! This is a new website that Samantha and I put together that is the one-stop shop for everything Sam and Dar. But it will be more than just a photography site, or a place to get eBooks or workshops. The concept behind oopoomoo relates more to our attitude towards life. Life is short:  why not just do the things you love and live a balanced healthy lifestyle? Why not give back a little instead of always taking? Why not live a little softer on the planet? Why not have fun and smile a lot? Well, oopoomoo is our attempt to live that kind of life. We are photographers and photography instructors and we love our work. But we also love nature, hiking, eating, drinking, art, music and, in short, life. We want oopoomoo to reflect our passion about these things, and we want to share our passion for living well with the world. We would love to have you come along!

Ultimately we will be ending all our other websites so we can concentrate on oopoomoo and all the fun and meaningful projects we hope to engage in. So we will stop posting on our personal blogs (both this blog and Sam’s blog will finish at the end of the this year). Ultimately we will also end our personal websites and have everything we do happen at oopoomoo.

Finally, over at oopoomoo we decided affiliates and sponsorships wasn’t our thing.  We’ll let others continue on with these kinds of partnerships because they are good at them! We find our time is pretty much taken up trying to live our new philosophy on life.

Drop by oopoomoo and let us know what you think and stay tuned for all sorts of interesting posts on photography and life!

Darwin and Sam

The Weekly Photo – November 7, 2011

Posted in Art of Photography, Image Processing and Software, Techniques, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 7, 2011 by Darwin

Making photos usually does not stop at pressing the shutter. Image making is a three part process and this process was really popularized by Ansel Adams in his series of books; The Camera, The Negative and The Print. In today’s digital world photography world, we capture images in our camera, we process the resulting image (often a RAW ‘negative’) in the computer and then we output our images to print (or the web) so the process has not changed just the technology of how we do the process.

I would add a fourth component to Ansel Adams equation and that is The Person. The camera does not make the image; it is the photographer. What interests you, what attracts your eye, what you choose to include or exclude, how you compose and ‘see’ are individual and personal. So let’s not forget that the end product is the result of the personal vision of the photographer (and this vision can and should carry through from seeing to capture, development and print).

As a photographer who learned and grew up photographically using slide film, I was mostly denied the luxury of carrying my photographic vision beyond the press of the shutter. The end product was the slide (a piece of positive film). The image was ‘processed’ by a lab and there was little ‘creative’ input at the processing stage (save for altering the the exposure by pushing or pulling the development). Really, the film was developed in a set formula to insure that the exposure captured in-camera was the exposure that came out on the slide. And as far as printing was concerned slide film could be printed but with difficulty and serious photographic printers stuck with negative film. Mostly slides were used to hand to publishers who printed the image in books and magazines and calendars (the printing was out of the photographer’s control). The simple point here is that a slide shooter had to use all his or her craft and art in the capture stage. The image had to be finished in-camera. End of story.

I was reminded of the ‘getting it right’ in-camera during a recent Creative Expression Masterclass workshop with Royce Howland and Samantha Crysanthou. For some of the exercises in seeing we needed participants to capture images in-camera using JPEG and the images were not to be processed after the fact. Having to capture what to what you see and getting it the best possible in-camera is great exercise in discipline. Even this former slide shooter realized just how much I have come to rely on ‘enhancing’ my personal vision through the development of the digital negative. The image below is an in-camera JPEG capture and this image reminded me how rewarding it was and is to get a completely finished image in-camera. No post-processing was done on this image save for resizing and sharpening for the web.

©Darwin Wiggett

Canon EOS-1ds Mark III, Canon TS-E 24mm lens, 1/4s at f11, Singh-Ray LB warming polarizer, Singh-Ray 3 stop soft-edge grad filter.

Beyond the Trophy

Posted in Art of Photography, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 1, 2011 by Darwin

Samantha and I just got back from the SNAP! Photography Seminars ‘Weekend Workshop’ with John Marriott which, based on the feedback forms was a great success. We had a wonderful group of talented photographers ranging from absolute beginners to semi-pro shooters. Because our location was based in the heart of Banff National Park near Lake Louise it was hard for photographers not to wish for ‘good light’ for the sunrise and sunset shoots. Good light to most of us means richly-coloured skies and warm light skimming across the peaks. Well, the weather did not co-operate with these expectations and we were mostly met with overcast skies.

The problem with expectations is that they blind you to other opportunities which can lead to thrilling images. On the last day of the workshop we all went to Lake Louise at sunrise. Of course, there was no sunrise but instead it was cloudy, then fog rolled in, and then it started to snow. There was some grumbling about the ‘crappy’ light but where some people saw a curse of bad luck, others found inspiration. There really is no such thing as bad light (just bad attitudes ;-)). Below are two images made from the ‘crappy light’ that morning at Lake Louise that show that photographers with an open mind can create amazing images no matter what the conditions.

These two photos were the images that John, Sam and I felt were the most compelling of the weekend (all made in the ‘worst’ light by the way). To us these were refreshing and novel images of Lake Louise. How many more pink alpen-glow images need to be made from here anyway? To see more work by each photographer simply click on their photos. Watch in the future for new workshop offerings from Samantha and myself and new offerings from John Marriott.

©Wojtek Zlobicki

©Rosana Ramos

Fabulous Film Fridays – October 28, 2011

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2011 by Darwin

In early September, Samantha, Hiroaki Kobayashi and I went on an afternoon film outing at the RancheHouse in Cochrane, Alberta. Both Sam and Hiro shot with their 4×5 view cameras while I used Linny, my Linhof 6×12 panorama camera. Sam posted her results last week and you can see Hiro’s results at this link. Below are my three favorite shots from the session. Click on each image to see a much larger version.

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome Velvia 50 film

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome 50 Velia film

©Darwin Wiggett - Fujichrome 50 Velvia film

Fabulous Film Fridays – Sam Says WTF!

Posted in Fabulous Film Fridays with tags , , , , , , , on October 21, 2011 by Darwin

Head on over to Sam’s Blog to read her rant about ‘professional’ drum scans from film. Seems like if you want something done right… you need to do it yourself. Can a digital SLR make a ‘scan’ of a 4×5 slide (using a macro lens and a light box to rephotograph the slide) that is better than a dedicated drum scanner? Check it out and see what you think. And maybe you have some advice on where Sam can go to get drum scans done that are professional?

All she wants is for things to work the way they are supposed to!

Two Openings for SNAP! Weekend Workshop – Oct 27-30, 2011

Posted in Good News, Workshops and Seminars with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2011 by Darwin

We’ve had a couple of cancellations for the SNAP! Photography Seminars Weekend Workshop with John E. Marriott, Samantha Chrysanthou and yours truly coming up on October 27 – 30, 2011. This means if you are able to take advantage of a last minute opportunity, then now is your chance!  The workshop sold out early this year, leaving a few disappointed photographers out there – our apologies!  So don’t hesitate if you are interested.  The workshop, based out of beautiful Baker Creek Chalets near Lake Louise, is geared toward beginner to intermediate shooters. We cover topics ranging from artful compositions to useful filter techniques with plenty of constructive critique throughout the weekend.  A combination of class and field time ensures that you get to practice your new skills, and a low instructor-to-student ratio guarantees all your questions will be answered!  (If you have questions about the meaning of life, John Marriott will be happy to answer them!!). For more information on the workshop and topics covered visit the SNAP! website. To register contact Baker Creek Chalets.

We hope to see you at the workshop!

©Darwin Wiggett